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Thursday 11/12/15 brain dump

8:30 General session panel – teachers, science & societal controversy

Ken Miller on teaching evolution. 

Watch “Judgement Day” documentary on intelligent design (Nova). Read: Alan Leshner – “Bridging the opinion gap” (Science).

Bombarding people with facts doesn’t work. Information is not the key, in fact it may harden views. The problem is “cultural cognition” an unwillingness of people to identify with the scientific community because of a number of ingrained beliefs/practices (Dan Kahan).

– cultural connections to science matter.

– Is there hope? When you look at an age related breakdown, there IS. Young people are much more accepting of evolution.

Jacquelyne Gill – paleoecology at University of Maine

How did ecosystems respond to climate change in the past, and how can that inform what may happen in the future. (Forensics for the environment)

Communication requires an empathic connection. As scientists, we’re trained in factual defense, and this isn’t really the best way to go about it. Many people tend to reject the Consensus Model (statements like “97% scientists agree”). It’s not going to convince anyone. In fact, it’s important to recognize that many ideological differences are really about government and how much regulation we’re comfortable with.

In talking with people, “make an incremental push in the realm of trust.” This was a terrific talk.

Seth Mnookin – on vaccination – Putting his book “The Panic Virus” onto the stack

Do you make decisions based on emotions or truth? Both. First, find out the truth, the reality (as a journalist)

Emotions run the opposition. And the way to counter that is not by attacking it, but by an empathic connection. You can’t convince the conspiracy theorists. This connects with what Jacquelyn said. Make “I” statements about what works for you based on research.

I’m going to read this book.

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Cross-posted at HowToUse65.

So, with the interest of collaborating and sharing ideas with other educators, many teachers have begun to “build” their own Personal Learning Network (PLN). “Grow” a PLN might be a better way to put it, since a PLN expands organically (in some ways), and it requires tending, occasional pruning, and general upkeep not unlike a plant or garden. It’s also made of living people. Making connections with other professionals in one’s field is not a new idea. Professors and scholars of all kinds have been traveling to other cities, monasteries, and universities for centuries with the intent of sharing information and learning from others. This happens today, although The Professional Conference now plays a significant role in many fields, as do the organizations that sponsor those conferences (NSTA, NABT, NCTM, NAIS, etc).

Everybody has a PLN, by the way. Your PLN includes the people in your department, colleagues present and past; they could be down the hall or a phone call or email away; it might include classmates from your college or university, folks you’ve met at conferences, on trips, through old fashioned social networking (family connections and cocktails), or sometimes they are simply friends of friends. Who do you turn to when you have a question about content, about teaching, assessment, learning styles, use of time, lab procedure? Who do you bounce ideas off of? Those people are part of your PLN (whether you’ve called it that or not). I can’t help but think of the old Sesame Street song — and I apologize in advance, a little, for getting this stuck in your head — “Who are the people in your neighborhood?

What’s different now is how people are making connections outside of those conferences, using the Web to share best practices, pedagogy, breakthroughs, field work, etc. (a web-based PLN). Blogs can also be a terrific forum for conversations, ones that allow for reflection, thoughtful comment, and discussion.

There are many ways that the Web can help to connect people:

Teaching networks like Classroom 2.0 are designed with connecting teachers of all disciplines. The Synapse is a similar network specifically for teachers of biology, and I’m looking forward to making new connections and participating there.

Twitter is a remarkable resource that’s used by many different people in many different ways. Thousands of educators have latched onto this tool as a way of sharing information and making connections. I joined Twitter during a workshop at November Learning‘s Building Learning Communities conference back in 2008, and it’s been key in growing my PLN. The website Twitter4Teachers is one of many that make it easy to find colleagues by discipline in other schools, districts, states, and countries. It can also be used in the classroom.

I use Delicious primarily as a way to keep track of web links from interesting articles I find online. If I don’t have time to read it all, or if I know I’ll want to have access to it later, I’ll add it to my bookmarks. I’m curious to find out how other people use Delicious.

This is just a start. Which tools you’ve found most helpful in connecting with other educators?

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